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THE TRUE POCAHONTAS ~ A STORY YOU MAY NOT KNOW

Posted by on Apr 3, 2014 in Blog, Books, History, Uncategorized | 2 comments

April 5th will be the 400th anniversary of the wedding of John Rolfe and Pocahontas. It is to be commemorated this weekend at the original church site in Historic Jamestowne with a reenactment.

The story of Pocahontas that most of us learned as children is very different than the story I heard a few years ago when we relocated to within eight miles of Jamestowne/Jamestown, VA. I found out from a friend that her husband is the Mattaponi Indian tribe historian, one of the two remaining tribes of the Powhatan nation.  Several years ago, Dr. Linwood “Little Bear” Custalow and his coauthor Angela L. Daniel “Silver Star” published The True Story of Pocahontas a book, based on the sacred oral history of her people. Her story was hidden for four hundred years by her people for fear of potential retribution. Their treatise explains the motives behind the myths as well as a reasoned explanation of their version of her story.

Dr. Custalow explains that the Algonquian tribes of the Virginia Coastal Plain did not have a written language so the oral history was passed down through quiakros (Powhatan priests) within each of the tribes in a “strict and disciplined manner to maintain accuracy”. These Mattaponi elders were venerated and protected leaders to ensure their story would be truthfully told. 

The English version of her story primarily comes from the writings of Captain John Smith. However, there are significant differences in the Powhatan and John Smith/English versions of the Pocahontas story: Here are a few:

Statue of Pocahontas  at Jamestowne

Statue of Pocahontas
at Jamestowne

 

Her birth and family: 

Smith/English Version – Pocahontas was born to one of many alliance wives.

Powhatan Version – Pocahontas, whose original name was Matoaka, was born to Chief Powhatan Wahunsenaca, the paramount chief of the Powhatan chiefdom, and Pocahontas of the Mataponi, who died in childbirth. Pocahontas’ mother was his first wife, the wife of choice and the one he loved. Other wives were alliance marriages, temporary unions meant to unite the 30 plus tribes under one paramount leader and to increase the Powhatan nation. Matoaka was later called Pocahontas to honor her deceased mother. As the last child of her mother she became particularly favored by her father.

Relationship with John Smith and English:

Smith Version –Pocahontas wandered freely through the Jamestown settlement and risked her own life by to save his when he was in the midst of a four day ceremony making him werowance, a “secular chief” of the English tribe.

Powhatan –Pocahontas was ten years old and did not live near Jamestowne. As the chief’s beloved child, she would not have wandered freely but always been under protective supervision. She was often with her father when he was in the midst of the English so she would be familiar to Smith. The Powhatans accepted the English as another tribe, even making Smith werowance. During these ceremonies, in which quiakros would have been involved, children were not present. In addition to not being present, there was no need to save Smith’s life as his life was not in danger.

Pocahontas kidnapping:

English Version– Pocahontas was kidnapped and held for ransom by Captain Samuel Argall when they learned that she was staying with a northern tribe. She was to be kept as a bargaining tool, to get what food they wanted from the Indian nation and to ensure their well being. The English at Jamestown were trying multiple methods to make their venture profitable to continue to validate their presence and ensure that financing of Jamestowne continued from the Virginia Company and the crown.

Powhatan Version–Pocahontas had come of age, and for her protection and to keep her away from the “English” tribe that had grown greedy in their demands and usurpation of land, she was married to a warrior, Kocoum, brother of the chief of the Patowomac (northernmost tribe). While in his village she and her husband had a son. In order to protect his village from the English threats, the Patowomac chief collaborated with Argall and allowed him to kidnap Pocahontas. Argall gave the chief a copper pot to make it appear that the girl was given up for material goods. Sometime after she was kidnapped, Argall’s men returned to the village and killed her husband. Chief Powhatan Wahunsenaca paid the ransom for her release, but she was not returned. He was reluctant to mount a rescue attempt for fear of endangering Pocahontas.

Pocahontas conversion and marriage:

English Version – Pocahontas was transferred to a location near present day Richmond where she was instructed in the English language and ways, and taught about Christianity. She was told that her father would not meet her captor’s demands. When Pocahontas grew depressed, a request was sent to her father to send one of her sisters. During Pocahontas captivity she became acquainted with John Rolfe, an English colonist who had learned how to cultivate tobacco from the Powhatans. A pious widower, Rolfe wanted to marry Pocahontas, but required her conversion to Christianity. She was baptized, took the name Rebecca and was married to Rolfe.

Powhatan Version – Her father sent Mattachanna, the sister who raised her, and her husband, Uttamattamakin a priest of the highest order and an advisor to Pocahontas’ father. Nothing is known of what happened during Pocahontas captivity until her sister and brother-in-law arrived.  When they were reunited, Pocahontas informed Mattachanna that she had been raped and was pregnant. Mattaponi history suggests reasons why they believe someone other than John Rolfe was the father. Pocahontas’ feelings were unknown, but as Powhatan royalty, she probably saw the alliance as helpful to her people and that would have been very important to her. Pocahontas gave birth to Thomas Rolfe sometime later.

 Pocahontas-and-Thomas-Rolfe-The-Sedgeford-Portrait


Pocahontas-and-Thomas-Rolfe-The-Sedgeford-Portrait

Pocahontas travel to England and death:

English Version – John Rolfe, Pocahontas and Thomas Rolfe, and some Powhatans (including her sister and brother-in-law) traveled to England to demonstrate the potential profitability of tobacco, thus assuring continued support for the Virginia colony. Pocahontas was presented to the crown and society, thereby assuring England that relations with Native Americans were positive. In March of 1617, shortly after departing England, Pocahontas suddenly became ill and died. Rolfe requested the Captain make port at the closest church, St. George’sChurch at Gravesend, where she was buried. The English attributed her death to pneumonia or tuberculosis.

Powhatan Version – Samuel Argall, her captor, was the Captain of the ship the Rolfe family traveled to and from England. Not yet on the open seas, Pocahontas and Rolfe dined in the Captain’s quarters. After returning to her room, she immediately began vomiting, and told her sister “that the English must have put something in her food”. Mattachanna tried caring for her but Pocahontas went into convulsions. Rolfe was summoned and she died within minutes. After her funeral, young Thomas Rolfe was given to relatives of John Rolfe in England to raise. The ship, passengers and crew continued their voyage to Virginia. Pocahontas was in good health when they left England. It is believed that she had gotten information of schemes to dethrone her father and take the Powhatan land, and that she would share that knowledge with her people. Mattaponi sacred oral history believes she was poisoned, but they do not know by whom, or how many people were involved. Chief Powhatan grew despondent and had to be relieved of his responsibilities. He died within a year. Some descendants of the Indian son Pocahontas bore are still alive today. Her son, Thomas Rolfe, was raised in England and returned to Virginia as an adult after John Rolfe was deceased. His descendants number among many prominent Virginia families.

 

~         For more information on Dr. Lin Custalow’s book: 

         The True Story of Pocahontas: The Other Side of History

http://www.amazon.com/True-Story-Pocahontas-Other-History-ebook/dp/B0028ADK1G/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1396482338&sr=1-1&keywords=the+real+pocahontas

~       For more information about the commemorative wedding service:

https://historicjamestowne.org/

 

Most of this post appeared previously in September 2012 in Colonial Quills.

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ST. PATRICK ~ British Patron Saint of Ireland

Posted by on Mar 17, 2014 in Blog, History, Uncategorized | 6 comments

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, I thought I’d share a post I did on Colonial Quills last year.

One March day at church, about fifteen years ago, I was introduced to a prayer attributed to Saint Patrick. Having Irish ancestors, I had some basic knowledge about the Irish patron saint. But I was so moved by the prayer, I decided to do some more research on this iconic and legendary character.

Did you know that St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is not Irish? 

He was born in Roman Britain to aristocratic parents around 385 A.D. Even though his father was a deacon and other members of his family were clergy, the family was not particularly religious. At the age of sixteen, he was captured by Irish pirates who took him to Ireland, probably around County Mayo, and sold him into slavery. While there he was assigned to tend sheep. It was during that period in relative isolation that his prayer life developed and he began to believe that his captivity may well have been part of God’s plan. He began to dream that he was to free the Irish people from their druid beliefs and to share the gospel of Christ with them. After six years, Patrick believed he heard from God that he was to escape and make his way back to Britain. When he had walked the two hundred miles to the Irish coast, God gave him another revelation; that he would return to Ireland as a missionary.

 

Window in Gloucester Cathedral                                                                                                                                      of St Patrick being taught by St Germanus

Window in Gloucester Cathedral of St Patrick being taught by St Germanus

He was reunited with his family in England briefly before departing for France where he would remain for fifteen years. In France he entered the priesthood and studied under the missionary St. Germain. However, he never lost

sight of his dream of returning to Ireland to spread “The Good News”.

Around 431, Patrick was consecrated Bishop of the Irish and returned to the island of his captivity. While he initially experienced some resistance, Patrick eventually convinced the Druids to abandon their belief system that kept them enslaved and convinced them to find freedom in Christ. He built up the church in Ireland, establishing monasteries and organizing the land into dioceses. Patrick died March 17, 461 in Saul, County Down, Ireland where he is said to be buried.

Did you know that St. Patrick did not introduce Christianity to Ireland?                                                 

He was not the first Christian missionary, but he was the most successful.

Did you know that St. Patrick did not chase the snakes out of Ireland?                                                 

That’s the stuff of legends. However, if the snake is a symbol of paganism, St. Patrick can be credited as removing paganism from Ireland and converting it to Christianity.

Do you know what the association is between St. Patrick and the shamrock?      Shamrock 2 

St. Patrick used the shamrock, a common clover, as a metaphor to teach the Irish people about the Trinity.

Do you know when St. Patrick’s Day was celebrated in the colonies?                                                 

St. Patrick’s Day was first celebrated as a Catholic Holy Day in the U.S. in Boston in 1737.

The first St. Patrick’s Day parade was not in Ireland, but in Boston in 1762 when Irish soldiers serving in the British army marched in New York to honor their Irish heritage.

 As the Irish migrated, more people became familiar with the remarkable story of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland and St. Patrick’s Day remains a Holy Day in the Roman Catholic, and some Protestant denominations. For many throughout the world, St. Patrick’s Day is a secular holiday, celebrated with parades, traditional Irish meals and all sorts of festivities.

 gold and green celtic cross

ST. PATRICK’S PRAYER

 

“I rise today in the power’s strength, invoking the Trinity believing in threeness, confessing the oneness, of creation’s Creator.

 I rise today in the power of Christ’s birth and baptism, in the power of his crucifixion and burial, in the power of his rising and ascending, in the power of his descending and judging.

I rise today in the power of the love of cherubim, in the obedience of angels and service of archangels, in hope of rising to receive the reward, in the prayers of patriarchs, in the predictions of the prophets, in the preaching of apostles, in the faith of confessors, in the innocence of holy virgins, in the deeds of the righteous.

 I rise today in heaven’s might, in sun’s brightness, in moon’s radiance, in fire’s glory, in lightning’s quickness, in wind’s swiftness, in sea’s depth, in earth’s stability, in rock’s fixity.

 I rise today with the power of God to pilot me, God’s strength to sustain me, God’s wisdom to guide me, God’s eye to look ahead for me, God’s ear to hear me, God’s word to speak for me, God’s hand to protect me, God’s way before me, God’s shield to defend me, God’s host to deliver me,  from snares of devils, from evil temptations, from nature’s failings, from all who wish to harm me, far or near, alone and in a crowd.

 Around me I gather today all these powers against every cruel and merciless force to attack my body and soul, against the charms of false prophets, the black laws of paganism, the false laws of heretics, the deceptions of idolatry, against spells cast by women, smiths, and druids, and all unlawful knowledge that harms the body and soul.

 May Christ protect me today against poison and burning, against drowning and wounding, so that I may have abundant reward; Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me; Christ within me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me; Christ to the right of me, Christ to the left of me; Christ in my lying, Christ in my sitting, Christ in my rising; Christ in the heart of all who think of me, Christ on the tongue of all who speak to me, Christ in the eye of all who see me, Christ in the ear of all who hear me.

I rise today in power’s strength, invoking the Trinity, believing in threeness, confessing the oneness, of creation’s Creator. For to the Lord belongs salvation, and to the Lord belongs salvation and to Christ belongs salvation. May your salvation, Lord, be with us always.”

St. Patrick's Grave

St Patrick’s Grave, Downpatrick

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Is Your Dream Part of God’s Plan?

Posted by on Mar 7, 2014 in Blog, Devotions, Journal, Uncategorized | 4 comments

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord,

“plans to prosper you and not to harm you,

plans to give you hope and a future.

Then you will call on me and come and pray to me,

and I will listen to you.

You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.”

Jeremiah 29:11-13

 

We all have dreams; some even go back as far as our childhood. If you think back, perhaps yours were to be a fireman, doctor, nurse, lawyer, astronaut, entertainer, musician, teacher, or something else.  Those dreams often change as we mature, and are often influenced by others, or our own circumstances and can include marriage, children, and other life choices.

Our culture can color our values and our dreams, causing us place too much importance on affluence, fame, influence, power, or popularity, and that can leave us feeling very dissatisfied.

Some dreams are fulfilled, others not, and occasionally they take a long time to be realized. After many years of not always aligning my hopes to God’s plans, I discovered that when my dreams and God’s plans were in agreement, the results were blessings.

 

“Take delight in the Lord,

and he will give you the desires of your heart.”

Psalm 37:4

 

DaydreamerOne example from my own life occurred in the mid 90’s when, after sixteen years of being a stay at home mom, I needed to return to work. My previous career in the banking and mortgage lending arena was not one I wished resume. My new dream, when the time came for me to again seek employment, was to serve in ministry. I had been involved in Community Bible Study (CBS) classes for about ten years. CBS is a national ministry with hundreds of classes throughout the US, and an international ministry with classes in many nations. In 1995, when the time came for me to re-enter the workforce, I was able to get a job at their national/international office ― their only office ― 10 miles from my home. My dream and God’s plans were in agreement, the result brought numerous blessings.

 

“for it is God who works in you to will and to act

in order to fulfill his good purpose.”

Philippians 2:13

 

 I have shared previously my appreciation for the way Roy Lessin expresses timeless truths. Here are some of his gems from his online devotional Meet Me In The Meadow Our Dreams or God’s Desires:

“It is important for all of us, as followers of Jesus Christ, not to confuse human dreams with God’s desires, direction, and will for our lives. Our dreams, compared to God’s desires and purposes, can be very different and we need to understand those differences:

~ Human dreams can be based upon fantasies;

      God’s desires for us are based upon reality and truth.

~ Human dreams can be born out of self-interests;

      God’s desires for us are based upon His will.

~ Human dreams can focus on what is pleasing to us;

      God’s desires for us will focus on what is pleasing to Him.

~  Human dreams can become the most important thing to us;

      God’s desires for us make Him and His ways the most important things to us.

~ Human dreams can focus on our self-significance;

      God’s desires for us focus on His glory.

~ Human dreams can place us at the center of our thoughts;

      God’s desires for us place Him at the center of our hearts.

~ Human dreams can be looked upon as the key to our happiness;

      God’s desires for us cause us to look to Him as the source of our joy.

~ Human dreams can bring discontentment when they are not fulfilled;

     God’s desires and will for us do not disappoint.

 

As we delight ourselves in the Lord, His desires will become our desires, and we can trust in Him to fulfill them in His time and in His perfect way.”

 

“Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine,

according to his power that is at work within us,”

Ephesians 3:20 NIV

 

I have some dreams I am still waiting to be fulfilled. What big dream are you waiting for?

 

Used with Roy Lessin’s permission from:

Meet Me In The Meadow Devotional Online, “Our Dreams or God’s Desires – Part 1 and 2.” http://www.meetmeinthemeadow.com/2013/07/our-dreams-or-gods-desires-part-1-of-2/

http://www.meetmeinthemeadow.com/2013/07/our-dreams-or-gods-desires-part-2-of-2/

 

 

 

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Meet Author Elaine Marie Cooper

Posted by on Jan 27, 2014 in Blog, Book Reviews, Uncategorized | 9 comments

It is a joy and privilege to have an opportunity to interview Elaine Marie Cooper, a special friend and fellow writer. Her latest book, Fields of The Fatherless is a heart-wrenching story with characters that will touch your heart. It is also a tale of faith and forgiveness.

Please tell us something about yourself, Elaine.

Elaine Cooper

Elaine Marie Cooper

 

Thank you so much for having me as your guest! It is my privilege to be here.

First and foremost, I am a Christian, wife, mom and GiGi to triplets who are almost four. I’ve been writing since I was very young but started my first novel in 2007. I never thought that I would be a writer of historical fiction but you never know what might happen with your life when the Lord places a love for both writing AND history in your heart! I am especially excited about my latest release, Fields of the Fatherless, as it is based on a true but little-known story that occurred in my hometown.

I’m going to start with some questions writers in particular may be interested in.

What sparked your interest in writing?

I’m not certain what sparked it but I know my father encouraged it. He seemed to understand my attraction to forming words into stories and I’m forever grateful to him. I know I loved poetry and music and often penned lyrics to songs. It was my series of humorous poems about the crazy life of motherhood that first attracted the eye of a newspaper editor who offered me a chance to freelance. That started the writing ball rolling for me. J

What genre do you like to write?

My favorite genre is historical fiction. Since I was a young girl in Massachusetts, I’d visit the historical sites where the American Revolution started and soak in all the information I could. Now that I live in the Midwest, on-site research for that era is a little more difficult but I make trips back to New England as often as I can. In between, I have my nose in books and online gathering as many facts as I can. I love the research. I’m such a history geek. J

Tell us about your journey to getting published. Did you get an agent before submitting to a publisher?

I’ve been on an atypical journey with my writing. When I started my first book, I knew nothing about the publishing industry; I just knew I felt called to write. When my first book was written in 2009, I began seeking out advice and heard the gloomy news that publishers were in a serious situation and few new writers were being picked up. Undaunted, I opted to self publish my first book. This was considered by most in traditional publishing to be the death-knell for an author. However, my first book has done modestly well and turned into a three-part saga. The third book in the saga was picked up by a small Christian publisher and they will pick up the first two books in the series this year.

My newest release was contracted after attending Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writer’s Conference and I had an appointment with the acquisitions editor at Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas. Before the year was out, I received a contract for Fields of the Fatherless. I have yet to find an agent, although I have not been actively looking.

What is your writing schedule and where do you write?

I’m not sure that I have a writing schedule per se but between my part time jobs, blogging and manuscript writing, I feel like I’m writing non-stop. All of my computer work is done in my home office and it’s nice to have it separate from the rest of my house. That way, when my fingers are telling me it’s time to pause for awhile, I can walk out and take a break.

What is your process? (Spreadsheets, Outlines, Seat of the pants?)

If I had to define my style for writing, I’d say “seat of the pants.” But I am surrounded at my desk by books, notebooks and an occasional outline to keep me on track. Once the muse gets started, however, the books are temporarily set aside while the spirit moves.

What words of advice would you give to beginning writers?

Go to a writer’s conference and connect with writers and editors. Attend classes there. Listen and learn. Be a sponge and soak in every bit of knowledge to help improve your writing. And pray for the Lord to open the doors where HE wants you to write.

Ok, now the story:

Your latest book, Fields of The Fatherless, focused on actual events. Please tell us a little more about the story.

Field of The Fatherless book coverThis story occurred at the very start of the American Revolution in my hometown of Arlington, Massachusetts. At the time, it was called MenotomyVillage. All the real events in my novel occurred the same day as the more-famous battles of Lexington and Concord, yet the battle of Menotomy saw more loss of life than any other town that day. It was the battle that occurred after Lexington and Concord, as the British troops were retreating back to Boston. By the time they had reached Menotomy on that retreat, the British were angry and out-of-control—and armed with plenty of guns and bayonets.

The story, written in fictional form, is told through the point of view of the 18-year-old woman who survived the battle. Betsy Russell was a real person who was very much a part of our history, yet has, for the most part, been unknown. I wanted to tell her story and the sacrifice that her family made that helped birth this nation

When I read Fields of The Fatherless, I was struck by its intensity and how emotionally draining it must have been for you. What inspired you to write this particular book?

I used to walk by Betsy Russell’s house when I was a little girl. (It is now known as the Jason Russell House and is a historical landmark.) When we were kids, my older brother tried to scare me by saying there was “blood on the floor” in there but I was quite intrigued by his description and never forgot the old two-story wood structure. A few years ago, I began to research that house and discovered the amazing story that so few seemed to know.

I was determined to share the family’s saga as well as the history of my hometown and, as with all my historical fiction, I wanted it to feel real. To do that, I tried to imagine everything that Betsy was experiencing during the months leading up to the war, as well as the terrible day of the battle, and the ensuing weeks that saw her mature in her faith and understanding of life. It was very emotional imagining all that Betsy went through and I often found myself in tears as I wrote Fields of the Fatherless.

God often teaches us something through our writing. What did you learn about life, faith, or yourself in the process of writing the Fields of The Fatherless?

I think my understanding was reinforced about how complicated life can be. How difficult it is when you have convictions about what is “right” yet how it can conflict with doing the right thing in God’s eyes. Life is never simple. But God always wants us to choose His way and that often is the braver—and more difficult—of two choices.

I know you are currently working on a book very close to your heart. Can you tell us anything about it?

My current WIP (work in progress) is called Bethany’s Calendar and is a far cry from my usual historical fiction. It is a memoir of my daughter’s journey in the last two years of her life when she suffered from a brain tumor. This is the book I never wanted to write yet I felt a clear conviction from the Lord at a writer’s conference three years ago that He would give me the strength to write this book. And He has. My hope with this story is that other families going through a serious illness of a loved one will be helped on their journey as I share my own. As a registered nurse, I also have some unique insight that I hope will help others. One thing is certain: Families in such a crisis feel so alone. I hope that my story can be a “companion” to them in their sorrow.

Thank you so much, Elaine, for being my guest. I know folks will enjoy your books.

Thank you so much for having me, Janet.

Where can readers find your books?

All of my books are available at Amazon.com in both paperback and e-book.

Website: www.elainemariecooper.com

FB: http://www.facebook.com/ElaineMarieCooperAuthor

Twitter: @elainemcooper

Other books by Elaine Marie Cooper:

The Road to Deer Run

The Promise of Deer Run (Winner of Best Romance, 2012 Los Angeles Book Festival),

The Legacy of Deer Run (Runner-Up in Romance, 2013 Los Angeles Book Festival)

 

 

 

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Hopping John ~ Hoppin’ John

Posted by on Dec 28, 2013 in Blog, Commentary, Uncategorized | 2 comments

For many years we have begun each New Year with Hopping John.  This traditional southern dish, also known as ‘Hoppin’ John in America, originated in North Africa and was probably brought to these shores as a result of the slave trade. The use of black-eyed peas dates back at least 3000 years when it was part of the Greek and Roman diet. There are many theories on how the name Hopping John started, from folks inviting guests into their homes at the new year with “hop in John” to children hopping around the table before sitting to enjoy the meal. Black-eyed peas are generally considered to assure good luck.

There are many recipes for Hopping John, but the primary ingredients in this tasty dish are black-eyed peas, also known as cow peas, rice and pork. Typically the dried peas are first soaked then cooked. Salt pork is added later. I started out doing just that, however, I’ve gone to a far simpler recipe in recent years. Let me share my recipe, and also how I’ve recently updated it at the urging of my husband who prefers it a bit spicier.

 Hopping John

 

Hopping John

2 cups of canned black eyed peas

½ – 1 lb bacon

(reserve 2 Tablesp of bacon drippings)

½ teasp. Black pepper

½ teasp. Salt

1 cup white uncooked white rice

Cook rice according to directions. Fry bacon and set aside. When rice is done, add black eyed peas, cooked bacon with a couple of Tablespoons of drippings, and salt and pepper. Stir together and heat on low heat for 10 minutes to allow flavors to blend. Chill leftovers and reheat when you are ready for more.

 

Spicier Hopping John 

2 cups of canned black eyed peas

½ lb bacon

(reserve 2 Tablesp of bacon drippings)

1 medium chopped onion

2 minced garlic cloves

1/ teasp of crushed red pepper flakes

½ teasp. Black pepper

½ teasp. Salt

1 cup white uncooked white rice

Cook rice according to directions. Fry bacon and set aside. Sauté chopped onion in reserved bacon drippings until soft and clear. Add garlic and pepper flakes to onion and heat for a couple of minutes. When rice is done, add black eyed peas, cooked bacon, and salt and pepper. Stir together and heat on low heat for 10 minutes to allow flavors to blend. Chill leftovers and reheat when you are ready for more.

There are many variations for this southern dish so feel free to experiment and make it your own.

My sons enjoyed it, and wondered why we only had it once a year. While we never ate it because it would bring good luck, we enjoyed Hopping John every New Years and hope that our new year would be blessed.

 

I hope your New Year will be filled with blessings galore.

 

 

 

 

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THE GREATEST GIFT EVER GIVEN

Posted by on Dec 23, 2013 in Blog, Devotions, Uncategorized | Comments Off on THE GREATEST GIFT EVER GIVEN

 

IS

 

JESUS

 Great Holy Family

THE MOST IMPORTANT GIFT YOU WILL EVER RECEIVE

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given,
and the government will be on his shoulders.
And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”
Isaiah 9:6,7

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